Archive for 14 dicembre 2019

Establishment journalists have betrayed the ideals of the Fourth Estate

dicembre 14, 2019

14.12.2019 – Pressenza London

Establishment journalists have betrayed the ideals of the Fourth Estate
How to Spot Fake News (Image by Wikimedia Commons)

The reluctance of senior British journalists to accept their failures has put us all in greater jeopardy. The election result will probably just embolden them.

Callum Alexander Scott for openDemocracy

13 December 2019

How unpleasant it has been over the past day to observe senior establishment journalists sit cosily alongside senior centrist and right-wing politicians and commentators, all agreeing on a single issue: Jeremy Corbyn and Labour’s policies have led us to this point. Moreover, what indifference – even admiration – many of them seemed to display for the disturbing majority won by one of the most callous, deceitful and self-centered prime ministers the UK has had in living memory.

As the data emerges, there will be comprehensive analyses of what went wrong for Labour over the coming weeks (hint: Brexit will be a key factor), but at this moment it is worth highlighting something else, something arguably more important, because it cuts right to the heart of our so-called democracy: senior British journalists, across press and broadcasting, have failed the electorate, and their refusal to admit it and reform is putting us all in greater jeopardy.

No matter that the British public overwhelming supportsLabour’s policies. And I’m not just talking about how establishment journalists have systematically delegitimisedCorbyn and his party for the past four years, or how they’ve accommodated a coordinated effort by the UK military and intelligence establishment to undermine him. I’m talking about their increasing subordination to, and amalgamation with, the political establishment, which this election has been a textbook example of. Let’s recap.

Downing Street sources

“Dog doesn’t eat dog,” wrote the award-winning journalist Nick Davies in his 2009 book ‘Flat Earth News’. He was referring to journalists scrutinising other journalists. It has “always been the rule in Fleet Street”, he explained, that “we dig wherever we like – but not in our own back garden”.

This rule was jettisoned back in October when veteran journalist Peter Oborne broke ranks (not for the first time) to criticise his colleagues’ conduct: “From the Mail, The Times to the BBC and ITN, everyone is peddling Downing Street’s lies and smears”, he boldly proclaimed. As he explained to a visibly uncomfortable and defensive Krishnan Guru-Murthy on Channel 4 News, senior British journalists have allowed themselves to be “gamed, to be managed [and] to be manipulated” by their Downing Street sources to pass on “smears, lies [and] fake news” to the public. Their callousness is “debauching British political discourse”, he added.

A day earlier, in an article for openDemocracy, Oborne had outlined multiple examples of senior British journalists uncritically publishing information that their anonymous Downing Street sources had told them – all of which later turned out to be untrue. Journalists and their news organisations, he wrote, are operating as a “subsidiary part of the government machine […] turning their readers and viewers into dupes”.

Particularly brave was his naming of the negligent journalists and the organisations they worked for, including his own employer the Daily Mail (unsurprisingly, it was soon revealedthat he would not renew his contract with the newspaper). For the first time in a while, dog had very publicly eaten dog.

For those unfamiliar with Oborne, he is not your typical media-bashing leftie. He has a long and distinguished career working as a political journalist at various conservative-leaning publications. Admired by colleagues, he’s been described as a freethinker and a maverick who “does not share any paper’s, editor’s or […] publisher’s agenda”, and he had previously resigned from the Daily Express and The Daily Telegraph on matters of principle.

In a more recent article for The Guardian, he described himself as someone who has “voted Conservative pretty well all my life”, yet in his three decades of political reporting has “never encountered a senior British politician who lies and fabricates so regularly, so shamelessly and so systematically” as Boris Johnson. The media, he said, have been letting Johnson get away with it (he has even compiled a dossier of the prime minister’s lies and distortions).

As interesting and important as Oborne’s intervention was, however, perhaps more interesting – and even more revealing – were the reactions of some of his fellow journalists. Those whom he named retreated into self-preservation, defending their failures rather than simply apologising for them and pledging to do better.

The hostility toward him was palpable. A key moment came when he was interviewed by journalist Amol Rajan on BBC Radio 2. Live on air, as Oborne named leading journalists who he said operated as mouthpieces for power, Rajan defensively interjected: “I think that’s out of order.” When the exchange intensified, Oborne accused Rajan of sucking up to power and engaging in “client” and “crony” journalism: “It’s time this system was exploded,” he emphatically declared.

The situation was reminiscent of an occasion back in 2018, when journalist and activist Owen Jones claimed that British journalism is afflicted by a “suffocating groupthink” and is “intolerant of critics”. His claim caused outrage among many of his colleagues, who, seemingly unaware that they were proving his point, collectively berated him via Twitter. “Never has a single tweet caused such consternation among the British commentariat”, wrote journalist Ian Sinclair.

Collective failure

This reluctance to accept criticism and admit what is obvious should, by now, have mortally damaged the already tarnished reputations of these journalists. In the final weeks of the election campaign yet more criticism emerged, as the press regulator IPSO ruled that the Mail on Sunday had falsely claimed that Labour was planning to scrap a tax exemption on homeowners.

In addition, few media outlets reported how a detailed studyby a non-partisan group of advertising professionals found that 88% of the Conservative Party’s most widely promoted campaign ads were either misleading or lying. They also found hundreds of Lib Dem ads to be at fault. The number of Labour Party ads they found to be misleading or lying? Zero. How much of the electorate was actually made aware of this?

The 2019 general election is likely to go down in history as a textbook example of when a media system failed to uphold its democratic ideal. We already know from comprehensive academic research undertaken by Loughborough University that coverage of the Labour Party across the press was overwhelmingly negative. The Conservatives, on the other hand, received consistently positive coverage.

Of course, this was to be expected from a majority right-wing press owned by billionaires. But even broadcast media, which is obligated by law to be impartial during elections, fell short of its standards, as research by academic Justin Schlosberg has shown. Moreover, the BBC, with its fabled commitment to accuracy and impartiality, was twice forced to apologise for painting Johnson in a positive light – it has enabled Johnson to get away with a “tsunami” of lies and has been “behaving in a way that favours the Tories”, wroteOborne.

And what was the BBC’s response to the criticism? In an article for The Guardian, the corporation’s director of news and current affairs, Fran Unsworth, simply denied that there were any problems with its reporting. She brushed the criticism off as just a “couple of editorial mistakes” and condescendingly described accusations of bias as “conspiracy theory”.

As the academic Tom Mills, author of ‘The BBC: Myth of a Public Service’ (2016), pointed out, this kind of failure to engage meaningfully with its critics may well lead to the BBC’s downfall. Of course, in some sense, one can understand why BBC staff and senior journalists refuse to accept criticism: their jobs depend upon their perceived legitimacy as reliable news sources. As the US muckraker Upton Sinclair observed: “It is difficult to get a man to understand something when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.” The problem, however, is that these senior BBC staff and journalists simply won’t have a salary to depend on if they continue down the path they’re on. Their sense of self-importance – that they are the only legitimate arbiters of information for the public – is repugnant to citizens across the political spectrum.

Reinforcing the point, Oborne alleged that senior BBC executives told him they believed it was wrong for them “to expose lies told by a British prime minister because it undermines trust in British politics”. The BBC denied this accusation, but if true, the arrogance of those executives’ belief that it’s within their right to withhold such information from the electorate is contemptible – and anti-democratic.

Loss of trust

British politics has been haemorrhaging trust for decades, and, by now, levels are well known to be flatlining. A big reason for this is the consistent failure of journalists to distance themselves from the political classes and serve their democratic purpose of holding them to account. Oborne has documented this. In the 1990s and 2000s, the capitulation of journalists to New Labour’s unprecedented use of information managementPR and spin did wonders to elasticise the truth and encourage the revolving doorbetween media and politics. In many ways this led to the media’s subsequent failures in the build-up to the Iraq war, its failure to provide sufficient knowledge and understanding of the 2008 financial crash, and its failure to show that austerity was a political choice, not an economic necessity.

Indeed, British political journalism has a lot to answer for. Many of the journalists who presided over the failures of the past decades are still working as gatekeepers and opinion leaders today, and their reluctance to admit to their mistakes and encourage reform of their organisations and practices has left them and the rest of us stewing in their mess. According to last year’s Edelman Trust Barometer, when 33,000 people across 28 countries were asked which institutions they trusted to do the right thing, “the media in general” came out as the least trusted in 22 countries (yes, the UK was one of them).

This is partly why so many people have turned to new and alternative media, which, in their infancy, are untainted by the distrust that lingers around legacy outlets. The new generation of journalists working these media have injected a fresh burst of energy and plurality into what had become a stagnant and parochial environment. The failure of legacy organisations to adapt and reform will continue to push people into their hands. But on the flip side, it will also continue to push people into the hands of individual politicians and their parties who can, in turn, push unmediated, unchecked and unregulated information back to them via digital platforms. That will embolden deceitful politicians and parties to lie and misinform. We had a taste of this during the election campaign when the Conservative Party absurdly changed its twitter account to factcheckUK.

One of the tragedies of this election result is that many senior journalists who always despised Corbyn and the policies he stood for will now attempt to use it as a tool to berate him with, beat back criticism with and vindicate themselves. Together with those centrist and right-wing politicians and commentators, they will say that Corbyn and his supporters are to blame, that they should ‘own their defeat’, and that they should, furthermore, stop blaming the media and journalists. While it’s certainly true that the Labour Party and its activists have some long, hard self-reflecting to do (particularly over the cultural issue of Brexit), that the British media and its senior journalists have nothing to do with the outcome of this election is bollocks.

In many ways, journalists have now become their own worst enemies: their refusal to accept their failures will almost certainly continue to erode what little is left of their already tarnished reputations and public trust levels. Moreover, for all the good they do serve, there is no avoiding the perception amongst much of the public that the media and politicians are ‘all the same’, because, to a large extent, this is correct.

Will Davies has recently commented recently on the ‘Berlusconification’ of British politics, where the once separate domains of politics and media have become indistinguishable: Johnson and Michael Gove are both former journalists, George Osborne now heads the Evening Standard, and so on. The failure of journalists to keep these domains separate goes a long way to explaining the current crisis of legitimacy befalling the media, and the result of this election. Journalists and politicians who ignore this are placing us all in deeper jeopardy as the principle of an independent ‘Fourth Estate’ falls further from sight. Given the scarcity of truth during this general election, one thing can be known for certain: the British media is in desperate need of radical democratic reforms.

Jugoslavia, memorie del Paese che non c’è più

dicembre 14, 2019

Quaccheri e cristiani non evangelici senza chiesa

Dunja Badnjevič : “Come le rane nell’acqua bollente”
Bordeaux Edizioni, 2019, 159 pp.

Jugoslavia, memorie del Paese che non c’è più

Recensione di Angelo d’Orsi

Jugonostalgia. La parola indica quell’insieme di sentimenti, pensieri, e una profondissima disillusione, che si agita nel cuore e nella mente di chi ha conosciuto e amato quello strano capolavoro che fu la Jugoslavia di Josip Broz Tito, che, alla fine di un’aspra guerra di liberazione antifascista e antinazista, la rifondò sotto forma di Repubblica Federativa nel 1945, che poi, nel 1963, divenne Repubblica Socialista Federale. Un capolavoro in quanto il maresciallo Tito seppe dosare centralismo e autonomia, alle singole etnie, che oggi, dopo la distruzione della Federazione sono diventati altrettanti Stati, o micro-Stati, che si sforzano, tra dramma e farsa, di costruirsi una individualità.  

Come si sa quel mosaico di culture lingue e religioni fu cancellato dopo la caduta del Muro, non tanto per…

View original post 791 altre parole

Greta Thunberg Slams COP25, Says Response to Climate Crisis Is “Clever Accounting and Creative PR”

dicembre 14, 2019

Ecumenics without churchs by www.quaccheri.it

14.12.2019 – Madrid, Spain – Democracy Now!

Greta Thunberg Slams COP25, Says Response to Climate Crisis Is “Clever Accounting and Creative PR”
(Image by Democracy Now)

At the U.N. climate summit in Madrid, 16-year-old Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg addressed world leaders Wednesday, hours after she was named Time magazine’s Person of the Year. Thunberg came to the talks after a trip to meet with climate leaders across North America in anticipation of the scheduled climate conference in Santiago, Chile, before the talks were abruptly moved to the Spanish capital. In her address, Thunberg warned that the planet’s carbon budget is down to just eight years, and urged bold action. “I still believe that the biggest danger is not inaction. The real danger is when politicians and CEOs are making it look like real action is happening when in fact almost nothing is being done apart from clever accounting and creative

AMY GOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from inside the United Nations Climate Change Conference…

View original post 1.518 altre parole

Il razzismo della stampa rende invisibili le proteste ad Haiti

dicembre 14, 2019

13.12.2019 – Redação São Paulo

Quest’articolo è disponibile anche in: SpagnoloPortoghese

Il razzismo della stampa rende invisibili le proteste ad Haiti

Secondo Lautaro Rivara, la comunità internazionale non vuole riconoscere la propria responsabilità nella crisi del paese caraibico.

L’America Latina sta vivendo un nuovo ciclo di proteste in paesi come Haiti, Cile ed Ecuador. Le richieste dei manifestanti, sebbene legate alla situazione specifica di ciascuno dei paesi, mettono in discussione i pilastri del neoliberismo nella regione, rappresentata dai suoi governatori.

Mentre in Cile le proteste sono iniziate dopo l’annuncio dell’aumento delle tariffe dei trasporti pubblici il 19 ottobre, in Ecuador e Haiti sono dovute all’aumento del prezzo del carburante a causa della fine delle sovvenzioni governative, una delle richieste del Fondo Monetario Internazionale per i prestiti concessi ai governi di Lenin Moreno (Ecuador) e Jovenel Moïse (Haiti).

Tuttavia, alcune differenze segnano questo ciclo. Nel caso di Haiti, l’insoddisfazione popolare ha portato in piazza milioni di manifestanti dal luglio 2018 e l’ultima mobilitazione è in corso da otto settimane. Nelle strade, la popolazione haitiana denuncia la mancanza di carburante e di risorse e chiede le dimissioni di Moïse. In uno scenario di inattività istituzionale, l’unica risposta del governo è stata la repressione della polizia.

L’America Latina sta vivendo un nuovo ciclo di proteste in paesi come Haiti, Cile ed Ecuador. Le richieste dei manifestanti, sebbene legate alla situazione specifica di ciascuno dei paesi, mettono in discussione i pilastri del neoliberismo nella regione, rappresentata dai suoi governatori.

Mentre in Cile le proteste sono iniziate dopo l’annuncio dell’aumento delle tariffe dei trasporti pubblici il 19 ottobre, in Ecuador e Haiti sono dovute all’aumento del prezzo del carburante a causa della fine delle sovvenzioni governative, una delle richieste del Fondo Monetario Internazionale per i prestiti concessi ai governi di Lenin Moreno (Ecuador) e Jovenel Moïse (Haiti).

Tuttavia, alcune differenze segnano questo ciclo. Nel caso di Haiti, l’insoddisfazione popolare ha portato in piazza milioni di manifestanti dal luglio 2018 e l’ultima mobilitazione è in corso da otto settimane. Nelle strade, la popolazione haitiana denuncia la mancanza di carburante e di risorse e chiede le dimissioni di Moïse. In uno scenario di inattività istituzionale, l’unica risposta del governo è stata la repressione della polizia.

Secondo i dati delle Nazioni Unite, 42 persone sono state uccise durante le proteste, e il numero è ancora più alto secondo le organizzazioni per i diritti umani del paese, che riportano più di 77 morti durante l’anno, 51 delle quali solo tra settembre e ottobre.

Nonostante la grave crisi politica, economica e sociale del paese caraibico, le proteste ad Haiti non hanno avuto la stessa visibilità sui media internazionali, né sono diventate una questione centrale nell’agenda di organizzazioni come l’ONU e l’OSA o blocchi multilaterali come il Gruppo Lima.

Secondo Lautaro Rivara, sociologo e giornalista argentino membro della Brigata di Solidarietà di Alba ad Haiti, l’invisibilità delle proteste è dovuta a due motivi. Da un lato, una visione razzista “totalmente stereotipata sulla realtà, la politica e la cultura del paese” – il primo a diventare indipendente in America Latina, con il trionfo della Rivoluzione haitiana (1804) – la cui popolazione è al 95% nera.

D’altra parte, da un’intenzionale negligenza della comunità internazionale “per non doversi assumere la propria partecipazione e la propria responsabilità nel fallimento assoluto della gestione politica di Haiti”.

“Dobbiamo ricordare che Haiti ha già avuto 15 anni di occupazione internazionale delle missioni delle Nazioni Unite, con la partecipazione e l’accompagnamento dell’OSA e con una tutela politica molto evidente da parte degli Stati Uniti e di altre potenze minori come Francia e Canada”, ha commentato l’attivista.

Nella conversazione del 29 ottobre con Brasil de Fato, Rivara ha parlato della grave crisi istituzionale che il paese caraibico sta attraversando e delle sfide per i movimenti popolari che si stanno organizzando per rovesciare il governo Moïse e chiedere una riforma del sistema politico ed elettorale di Haiti.

“I movimenti popolari stanno partecipando alle mobilitazioni, non solo dimostrando la loro forza nelle strade, ma anche discutendo idee e programmi politici per indicare soluzioni concrete, affinché la crisi non venga risolta dall’alto, attraverso accordi tra settori dell’oligarchia e Stati Uniti, come è accaduto in altre situazioni”, ha concluso.

Ecco l’intervista completa:

-Potrebbe commentare un po’ lo scenario generale di Haiti nelle ultime settimane?

-Stiamo vivendo la settima settimana consecutiva di proteste nel paese, che includono un ampio programma di richieste – frutto di una crisi economica ed energetica abbastanza grave, che punisce la stragrande maggioranza della popolazione che è molto povera -, e unificato sotto la comune richiesta di dimissioni immediate del presidente Jovenel Moïse (PHTK) e di tutta la sua squadra.

Per quanto riguarda la vita quotidiana, le scuole non funzionano, lo stesso presidente ha parlato da un’emittente radiofonica il 28, e ha detto che c’erano ancora attività scolastiche in cinque comuni del paese. Questa informazione non è stata confermata, ma il paese ha 144 comuni. L’attività ospedaliera è intermittente o inesistente.

La situazione nelle campagne – Haiti è un paese con un numero significativo di villaggi rurali e contadini – è assolutamente critica. Abbiamo parlato con diversi leader dei movimenti sociali contadini e tutti si sono trovati d’accordo su una diagnosi catastrofica. Tutti i raccolti sono sospesi perché non possono garantire la logistica, il trasporto di frutta e verdura ai centri di vendita e alle grandi città. La situazione alimentare del paese, di per sé drammatica, tende quindi a peggiorare sempre di più, soprattutto in alcune regioni come il sud-est, che fino ad oggi dipendono interamente dagli aiuti alimentari e dalla distribuzione di acqua da parte di organizzazioni internazionali.

Non esiste un’attività governativa o statale di alcun tipo; le grandi aziende sono permanentemente chiuse, come pure le banche; le istituzioni pubbliche e private, e i trasporti sono, nella maggior parte dei giorni, totalmente paralizzati. Soprattutto nella capitale del paese – Port-au-Prince – e nell’area metropolitana, a causa delle proteste quasi quotidiane, c’è solo una piccola circolazione di motociclette e nessun tipo di trasporto pubblico o di automobili individuali. La situazione è drammatica.

Un’altra dimensione importante è il bilancio della repressione della polizia, che è drammatico. Il silenzio mantenuto dalle organizzazioni internazionali per i diritti umani sulla questione di Haiti è scandaloso e quasi complice. Tra il 16 settembre e il 27 ottobre, stiamo parlando di 51 persone uccise con armi da fuoco, molte delle quali vittime della repressione della polizia durante le proteste.

Secondo i rapporti delle organizzazioni per i diritti umani nel paese stesso, ci sono 77 morti nel corso dell’anno e le cifre non sono aggiornate.

-Nel frattempo, Jovenel Moïse non si dimette né adempie al suo ruolo di capo di Stato. Potrebbe spiegarci qualcosa di più sulla crisi istituzionale ad Haiti in questo momento? Cosa mantiene il presidente al potere nonostante la sua scarsa popolarità?

-Oggi Haiti è un paese che non ha un governo, come stabilisce la propria Costituzione. Haiti ha un sistema misto che riconosce due figure esecutive: il primo ministro come capo di governo e un presidente come capo di stato. Il primo ministro non esiste più dalle dimissioni dell’ex primo ministro Jacques Guy Lafontant durante la crisi di giugno dello scorso anno. Alcuni primi ministri hanno assunto temporaneamente le sue funzioni e tutti hanno rassegnato le dimissioni. L’ultima non è stata nemmeno ratificata dalle due camere del Parlamento, come richiesto dalla Costituzione.

Oggi Haiti non ha un governo. Il paese non funziona con un bilancio pubblico, poiché l’ultimo bilancio è stato cancellato e il paese sta eseguendo i conti pubblici in modo del tutto arbitrario. Questa crisi istituzionale è grave e probabilmente peggiorerà perché, in ottobre,  avrebbero dovuto tenersi le elezioni parlamentari, ma non sono state fatte a causa della crisi.

Va notato che i 30 senatori del paese perderanno il mandato a gennaio. Non ci saranno elezioni fino ad allora. In questo modo, il presidente inizierebbe l’anno di governo con maggiore arbitrarietà, attraverso decreti esecutivi, perché non avrebbe un parlamento eletto e né un primo ministro.

E’ una situazione grave di uno Stato totalmente antidemocratico, ed è ancora sintomatico che organizzazioni sovranazionali, come l’ONU, l’OSA, le potenze occidentali che segnalano sempre una presunta mancanza di democrazia nei governi popolari dell’America Latina e dei Caraibi, non dicano nulla del malgoverno di Haiti. Ciò è collegato e può essere spiegato dall’allineamento del presidente Jovenel Moïse alla politica degli Stati Uniti nella regione dei Caraibi.

Oggi il presidente non ha alcun sostegno interno, né da parte delle imprese né da parte di settori della Chiesa cattolica. E tutti i movimenti sociali, i sindacati, le organizzazioni giovanili, gli studenti e altri sono nel campo dell’opposizione.

L’unico sostegno che il governo Moïse ha oggi è quello dell’ambasciata degli Stati Uniti e il silenzio complice delle organizzazioni internazionali. Qualche giorno fa, l’Ambasciata degli Stati Uniti ha presentato un comunicato che ripudia la “presunta violenza” nelle manifestazioni e garantisce la continuità del suo sostegno al governo. Sappiamo che gli Stati Uniti continueranno a sostenere il Presidente Moïse a prescindere dai costi e dagli effetti devastanti della sua politica.

-Pensa che le proteste ad Haiti siano meno visibili nei media?

-Sì, non c’è dubbio che le proteste ad Haiti sono state e sono rese invisibili dalle grandi agenzie mediatiche private. Se guardiamo, ad esempio, all’origine di questa crisi, nel luglio dello scorso anno, quando il FMI – come ha fatto in altri paesi – ha chiesto al governo di eliminare i sussidi per il carburante e di aumentare i prezzi di oltre il 50%, il che ha generato un ciclo di mobilitazione massiccia. Alcuni analisti e osservatori stimano, in queste proteste, 1,5 o 2 milioni di persone per le strade.

A quel tempo, le proteste dei giubbotti gialli iniziarono in Francia, proteste indette da migliaia di persone a Parigi. Se guardiamo al modo in cui i media hanno trattato quella notizia, è stato totalmente iniquo.

Migliaia di manifestanti – con giuste richieste, naturalmente – per le strade di Parigi, sono state notizie internazionali. Più di un milione in strada ad Haiti no. E Haiti è un paese che non ha nemmeno 11 milioni di abitanti. Ciò è passato completamente inosservato all’opinione pubblica internazionale.

Oggi, la crisi dimostra la volontà politica della comunità internazionale affinché ciò che accade ad Haiti non esca dal paese, in modo che non debbano assumersi la loro partecipazione e la loro responsabilità per il fallimento assoluto della gestione politica di Haiti.

Vale la pena ricordare che Haiti ha già avuto 15 anni di occupazione internazionale delle missioni delle Nazioni Unite con la partecipazione e l’accompagnamento dell’OSA e con una chiara tutela politica da parte degli Stati Uniti e di altre potenze minori come Francia e Canada.

Ciò è senza dubbio dovuto anche a considerazioni razziste nell’ignorare un popolo nero che è stato il fondatore della Prima Repubblica Indipendente del mondo. Ci sono una serie di considerazioni razziste, di pregiudizi e fallacie coloniali, una visione totalmente stereotipata della realtà, della politica e della cultura del paese che rende invisibile ciò che accade ad Haiti o, quando la gravità di alcuni eventi riesce a rompere l’assedio, la visione viene distorta.

Questo di solito accade, per esempio, quando troviamo quasi ogni giorno delle mobilitazioni totalmente massive e pacifiche, eppure la stampa che copre le proteste mette in evidenza solo la “presunta violenza” e il “carattere barbaro” e “caotico delle manifestazioni” che in nessun modo hanno questo carattere.

-Quali sono le sfide della sinistra e dei movimenti popolari di Haiti in questo momento di protesta?

In questo momento, la maggior parte dei movimenti popolari, sindacati e partiti politici si sono riuniti in uno spazio comune chiamato Forum patriottico, che si è tenuto dal 27 al 31 agosto in una piccola comunità rurale e ha riunito più di 200 leader delle forze politiche.

La sfida per questi settori è quella di incanalare il malcontento visibile e massivo che esiste nel paese per ottenere le dimissioni del presidente Jovenel Moïse, che è la prima condizione per iniziare a discutere le trasformazioni strutturali di cui il paese ha bisogno.

E, allo stesso tempo, essere in grado di presentare i cambiamenti strutturali. L’asse delle richieste è stato, sempre più, un cambiamento radicale, il malcontento per decenni di politiche neoliberali che hanno devastato Haiti e la riforma di un sistema politico che deve essere modificato.

All’ordine del giorno c’è anche la riforma del sistema elettorale, caratterizzato oggi dalla mancanza di trasparenza, fraudolenta, controllata tecnicamente e politicamente da consulenti stranieri, per garantire una soluzione sovrana e autonoma alla crisi.

I movimenti popolari partecipano alle mobilitazioni, non solo dimostrando la loro forza nelle strade, ma anche discutendo idee e programmi politici per indicare soluzioni concrete, affinché la crisi non venga risolta dall’alto, attraverso accordi tra settori dell’oligarchia e gli Usa, come è accaduto in altre situazioni.

Di Luiza Mançano / Brasil de Fato
Traduzione di Silvia Nocera

Yolanda - "Det här är mitt privata krig"

Kreativ text, annorlundaskap, dikter, bipolaritet, Aspergers syndrom, samhällsdebatt

Pioniroj de Esperanto

esplori la pasinton por antaŭenrigardi = esplorare il passato per guardare avanti

Haoyan Do

stories about English language and people in Asian communities in America and in Asia.

Il Blog di Roberto Iovacchini

Prima leggo, poi scrivo.

Luciana Amato

Parole e disincanto

friulimosaicodilingue

*più lingue conosci più vali*

Acquistaditutto.com

acquistionline,venditeonline,sport,casa,smartwatch,smartphone,iPhone,integratori,cucina,motori,pizza,pasta,

Giornalista Indipendente

Riproduzione Riservata - Testata Giornalistica n.168 del 20.10.2017

Nonapritequelforno

Se hai un problema, aggiungi cioccolato.

among Friends

the blog of four Quakers

Medicina, Cultura, e Legge

Articoli su Medicina, Legge e Diritto, ma anche Aforismi, Riflessioni, e Poesie. Autore: Stefano Ligorio

Quaker Scot

Occasional thoughts from Troon and beyond

Gioia per i libri

Recensioni - Poesie - Aforismi

Manuel Chiacchiararelli

Scrittore, Fotografo, Guida Naturalistica, Girovago / Writer, Photographer, Naturalist Guide, Wanderer

Pensieri spelacchiati

Un piccolo giro nel mio mondo spelacchiato.